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Slow-Moving Surface Breakouts Extend Flow Front a Short Distance

October 1, 2014

CLICK PHOTO TO WATCH VIDEO: This Quicktime movie gives a brief aerial overview of activity at the flow front. (USGS)

The following photos, maps and video were released by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (USGS) (Dated October 1, 2014) . Note: these photos were not taken in areas currently accessible to the public. (You can visit the official website of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park for current information on the areas of Kilauea that are open to public). Click here to see photos from previous post.

The thermal image on the right corresponds to the area of the white box shown in the normal photograph. The thermal image shows the distribution of active breakouts (yellow and white colors) clearly. (USGS)

A skylight provided a view of the swiftly moving lava stream in the lava tube. (USGS)

Activity in Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater has remained relatively similar over the past several weeks. Small lava ponds and incandescent holes are present in several pits on the crater floor. (USGS)

he June 27th flow remains active. Slow-moving surface breakouts have reached the stalled flow front and extended the leading edge of the flow about 30 meters (yards). The flow front today was 2.3 km (1.4 miles) upslope from Apaʻa St. and 3.3 km (2.1 miles) from Pāhoa Village Road. (USGS)

This map uses a satellite image acquired in March 2014 (provided by Digital Globe) as a base to show the area around the front of the June 27th lava flow. Surface activity near the flow front was advancing slowly northeast in two lobes. The active lobe farthest from the vent (the closest to Pāhoa) has now overtaken the stalled front and extended it by about 30 m (33 yards). It traveled about 150 m (273 yards) since Monday, September 29. A second lobe was about 450 m (492 yards) back from the stalled front, and it moved only about 140 m (153 yards) since Monday. (USGS)

This large-scale map shows the distal part of the June 27th flow in relation to nearby Puna communities. The black dots mark the flow front on specific dates. Small breakouts were still scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the front. A breakout upslope of the stalled front has now overtaken and extended the front by about 30 m (33 yards). Several breakouts were also active midway along the length of the flow near where lava first entered the crack system. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. (USGS)

This small-scale map shows the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone in relation to lower Puna. The area of the flow on September 29 at 10:30 AM is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as mapped on October 01 at 09:40 AM is shown in red. Small breakouts were still scattered across the surface of the flow upslope from the front. The closest surface activity to Pāhoa is a breakout upslope of the stalled front that has now overtaken and extended the front by about 30 m (33 yards). Several breakouts were also active midway along the length of the flow near where lava first entered the crack system. The blue lines show down-slope paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM). For an explanation of down-slope path calculations, see: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/. Down-slope path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map indicate approximate flow path directions. All older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line marks the lava tube. (USGS)

 

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. donahcbrown permalink
    October 1, 2014 5:12 pm

    Reblogged this on From Hawaii to the World and commented:
    The latest on the lava flow headed to Pahoa – it is moving again, but more slowly.

Trackbacks

  1. Emergency Preparedness in Hawaii Encompasses Multiple Hazards | Pacific Island National Parks
  2. Slow Advancement of Lava Flow Front Continues | Pacific Island National Parks

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